Checklist For Activities of Daily Living For Seniors For Seniors

It can be hard to keep track of everything you need to do each day as you get older.

Sometimes it feels like we have to give up some of our independence as we age. We have to rely on others to help us with the things we used to take for granted.

Whether you’re aged care at home specialist looking for a short checklist to keep in mind, a carer or family member trying to work out what help your elderly loved one needs, or a senior citizen looking for a reminder of what you can still do for yourself – this list is for you!

But first come first,

What are activities of daily living (ADLs)?

Activities of daily living are the things we do every day without thinking about them. They are the actions that allow us to take care of ourselves and live independently.

There are six main activities of daily living:

  1. eating
  2. drinking
  3. toileting
  4. dressing
  5. washing
  6. transferring in and out

Let’s discuss this in detail.

Activities of Daily Living For Seniors:

Eating:

The ability to feed oneself is an important part of daily living. For some seniors, this task may become difficult due to issues such as poor vision, arthritis, or Parkinson’s disease.

If you’re having trouble eating independently, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Use adaptive eating utensils, such as those with built-up handles or larger grips.

• Place food items closer to the edge of the plate so they’re easier to reach.

• Use a placemat with raised edges to keep plates and cups from sliding around.

• If cooking meals is becoming difficult, consider signing up for a meal delivery service.

Drinking:

Keeping hydrated is important for everyone, but it’s especially crucial for seniors. Older adults are more likely to experience dehydration due to medications, decreased thirst sensation, and changes in kidney function.

If you’re having trouble staying properly hydrated, there are a few things you can do:

• Drink small sips of water often throughout the day, even if you’re not thirsty.

• Keep a water bottle with you at all times, and refill it regularly.

• Add flavor to your water by infusing it with fruits or herbs.

• Drink other fluids throughout the day, such as juice, soup, or decaf tea.

Toileting:

For most of us, using the restroom is a relatively easy task. But for seniors with mobility issues or other health conditions, toileting can be a difficult and sometimes dangerous activity.

If you’re having trouble using the restroom independently, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Use a raised toilet seat to make it easier to sit down and stand up.

• Install grab bars next to the toilet and in the shower or tub.

• Keep a portable commode in your bedroom if you have difficulty making it to the bathroom in time.

• Use a bedside commode if you’re unable to get out of bed.

Dressing:

For many of us, getting dressed is a simple task that we do every day without thinking about it. But for seniors with mobility issues or limited range of motion, dressing can be a real challenge.

If you’re having trouble dressing yourself, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Choose clothing that’s easy to put on and take off, such as button-down shirts, slip-on shoes, and elastic-waist pants.

• Lay out your clothes for the day before getting dressed. This will help you remember what you need to put on and in what order.

• Keep a stash of adaptive clothing items, such as dressing aides, in your closet or bedroom.

Washing:

Keeping clean is important for everyone, but it can be especially difficult for seniors with mobility issues. Activities such as bathing, showering, and brushing your teeth can be difficult and sometimes dangerous.

If you’re having trouble washing yourself, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Use a shower chair or bench to avoid slipping and falling in the shower.

• Install grab bars in the shower or tub for added stability.

• Keep a stash of washcloths, towels, and other hygiene items within easy reach.

• Use adaptive devices, such as long-handled sponges and toothbrushes.

Transferring in and out:

Activities such as sitting down, standing up, and getting in and out of bed can be difficult for seniors with mobility issues.

If you’re having trouble transferring, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Use a transfer board or bench to help you move from one surface to another.

• Install grab bars in strategic locations, such as next to the bed and in the bathroom.

• Use a Hoyer lift or other assistive device to help you get in and out of bed.

• Ask for help from a family member, friend, or home health aide when necessary.

Walking:

For many of us, walking is a simple task that we do every day without thinking about it. But for seniors with mobility issues, walking can be a real challenge.

If you’re having trouble walking, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier:

• Use a cane, walker, or other mobility aid for added stability.

• Choose shoes that are comfortable and provide good support.

• Take short breaks often to rest your legs and catch your breath.

• Ask for help from a family member, friend, or home health aide when necessary.

Other instrumental activities of daily living

We do many other activities every day that can be difficult for seniors with mobility issues or other health conditions. These activities, known as instrumental activities of daily living, include cooking, cleaning, doing laundry, and shopping.

Read: 8 Queries to Ask Your House Healthcare Agency Or Registered Nurse